The Houses's Flowers

Flowers ensure the conservation of many species, providing as they do certain elements essential to the maintenance of the ecosystem as a whole. The abundant flowers in our gardens attract countless species of birds and insects to pollinate them. In addition, our plants have been used traditionally in the medicine, diet and folklore of the Andes. Below we list some of the species found in the Sacred Valley of the Incas:

Ayaq Zapatilla

Ayaq zapatilla (Calceolaria Sp.)
SCROPHULARIACEAE

Popularly known as the “devil’s slipper”, this plant’s original Quechua name has been lost. In its different varieties, it is used in traditional medicine.

Chimpu Chimpu

Chimpu Chimpu(Fuchsia boliviana)
OENOTHERACEAE

Also known as “queen’s earrings”, this Andean fuchsia produces juicy and tasty fruits, enjoyed by local children, birds and insects.

Chinchercoma1

Chinchircoma (Mutisia acuminata)
ASTERACEAE

This flower was once considered as a candidate for Peru’s national flower (F.L. Herrera). It is used in traditional medicine.

Hamanqae

Hamanqae (Ismene amancay)
AMARYLLIDACEAE

This popular flower is found in hedgerows or at the base of trees, where it thrives in the shade. It flowers in the rainy season.

Llaulli

Llaully (Barnadesia horrida)
ASTERACEAE

It is said that only an astute lover can pick this flower (the plant has a thorny calyx).
A traditional song is dedicated to the llaully.

Mentzella1

Mentzelia (Mentzelia cordifolia)
LOASACEAE

This delicate plant grows in poor soil and is used in traditional medicine.

MIchi Michi 1

Michi Michi (Hesperoxiphion peruvianum)
IRIDACEAE

This popular and delightful iris can be seen throughout the rainy season. Its whorls resemble cat’s heads (“michi” in Quechua), hence its name.

Nucchu3

Ñuqchu Imperial (Salvia dombeyiia)
LAMIACEAE

The flowers of this climbing plant are sought after for their medicinal properties and used to treat bronchial complaints, and they feature in Andean legends.

Oqa Oqa 1

Oqa Oqa (Oxalis Sp)
OXALIDACEAE

Connoisseurs say that the juice of this plant’s tender stalks is the best way to calm a walker’s thirst. It attracts bees in search of nectar.

Panti

Panti (Cosmos peusedamifolius.)
ASTERACEAE

This is perhaps the most sought after of local plants, because of its medicinal qualities. It is used in the treatment of bronchial complaints.

Pisnonay2

Pisonay (Erythrina falcata)
FABACEAE

This leafy and robust tree with its abundant flowers attracts birds, including parrots and hummingbirds. It is useful as part of river defenses.

Pupa 1

Pupa (Psitacanthus cuneifolius)
LORANTHACEAE

Also known as “little matches”, “liga liga” and “pupa”, the resin from this delightful plant is used to prepare strong glue employed to trap birds.

Qantu

Qantu (Qantua buxifolia)
POLEMONIACEAE

This is Peru’s emblematic shrub. Its many bright colors adorn ravines and valleys, and can been seen along pathways and in gardens.

plata rata rata

Rata Rata (Abutillon molle)
MALVACEAE

This shrub is considered important as an ingredient in medicinal poultices.

Rayan Sauco

Rayan (Sambucus nigra)
ADOXACEAE

Known locally as “sauco”, the bittersweet dark berries of this plant are eaten by local people. In the Sacred Valley, traditional families have passed on the secrets of this plant.

Sunchu

Sunchu (Viguiera mandonii)
ASTERACEAE

A large flowering plant, it attracts insects and is used medicinally.

Tumbo

Tumbo (Passiflora mixta)
PASSIFLORACEAE

Like all plants of the Passifloraceae genus, the flowers of this species are fragrant, and the delicious fruit it produces is enjoyed by birds, insects, rodents and local people.

Warango

Warango (Tecoma stans)
BIGNONIACEAE

This medium-sized tree is valued for its wood, which is used for tools and furniture.